Privacy Statement    (Return to login)
Effective Date: November 15, 2005

Material changes to this Internet Privacy Statement will be posted here.

This Privacy Statement describes the information practices of this Web site.  This website is an American Express Web site. This website and American Express respect your privacy and are committed to protecting it at all times. This Internet Privacy Statement explains how we collect, use, and safeguard information on this Web site. Click here to learn:

What Information We Collect and How We Use It
How We Safeguard Information
Protecting Your Personal Information

For any questions about your American Express-branded Card account, please call the number on the back of your Card.

What Information We Collect and How We Use It
Tracking Activity on Our Web Site
Setting Your Cookie Preferences
Children Under 13

Tracking Activity on Our Web Site
When you access this website, you will be asked to provide the first 6 digits of your American Express-branded Card account number, which allows us to determine the issuer of your American Express-branded Card only and allows us to display Offers and Experiences that have been made available to you by the issuer of your Card. This information can not be used to identify you personally. American Express will not collect any personally identifiable information-such as your name, address, phone number, or e-mail address on this website.

However, we track how our site is used by site visitors. One way we track is by using a small string of text that is sent to your browser known as a "cookie." Cookies collect information that includes the server your computer is logged onto, and your browser type (for example, Netscape or Internet Explorer). A cookie cannot retrieve any other data from your hard drive, pass on computer viruses, or capture your e-mail address or any other personally identifiable information.

Using cookies enables us to recognize your computer if you or someone else using your computer returns to our site, and to keep track of the pages on our site that you or another user of your computer visit. We share this information with the issuer of your Card to help us present more relevant offers and information.

You can adjust your computer browser settings so that you are informed when a cookie is being placed on your browser. You can also set your browser to decline or accept all cookies. Click here to learn more about setting your cookie preferences. Another way we track site activity is by using transparent electronic images called "clear GIFs," "Web bugs," or "Web beacons" on this Websites webpages. These images count the number of users who visit this website and activities conducted on this websites Web pages, such as the length of time a particular Web page was viewed and the pattern in which the Web pages were accessed.

Personal Information We Collect On Our Web site
We do not collect any personally identifiable information from this websites site visitors.
Setting Your Cookie Preferences
You can adjust your computer browser settings so that you are informed when a cookie is being placed on your browser. You can also set your browser to decline or accept all cookies. Click here to learn more about setting your cookie.
Children Under 13
We do not knowingly solicit data online from or market online to children under the age of 13.
 

How We Safeguard Information
Site Security Features
Selected Business Partners
Linking to Other Internet Sites
Site Security Features
American Express realizes how important security is to you and takes a number of steps to enhance the protection of any personal or confidential information sent to or from American Express over the Internet. However, as this website does not collect any personally identifiable information on its site, it is not necessary at this time to implement any additional security enhancements to protect personal or confidential information sent to or from this website over the Internet.

Selected Business Partners
In order to bring you the online products and services offered on this website, we work with carefully selected vendors and business partners. Anticipating that it may be necessary for you to share information with such companies, we require technical and physical safeguards to ensure the security and confidentiality of any personal and confidential information they may receive. At any time, we may audit our partners and vendors to verify the continued security of their systems and practices.
Linking to Other Internet Sites
You should be aware that other Internet sites that you link to from this website may contain privacy provisions that differ from the provisions of our Privacy Statement. To ensure your privacy is protected, we recommend that you review the privacy statements of other Internet sites you visit.
Protecting Your Personal Information
Below is a helpful guide to the many ways you can protect your privacy. You can find out how companies collect, store, and use data related to your personal and financial history. You may also have control over how certain information is used.

Credit Records
Telecommunications
Rebate, Incentive, Discount, and Warranty Programs
Direct Mail, Telemarketing, and E-mail Offers
Identification Needed for Purchases
For More Information

Credit Records
Credit bureaus compile records of individual consumers' credit habits to assist lenders, employers, and other businesses in assessing an applicant's creditworthiness. It is recommended that you obtain a copy of your credit report at least once a year to check for inaccuracies. Checking for inaccuracies will enable you to correct mistakes before you apply for a job, credit card, loan, or insurance.

In the United States, credit records are usually maintained by credit bureaus that generally operate on one of three national reporting systems:

Equifax, Inc.
P.O. Box 740241
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
800-685-1111
www.equifax.com

Experian, Inc. (formerly TRW)
P.O. Box 2002
Allen, TX 75013
888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Trans Union LLC
P.O. Box 1000
Chester, PA 19022
800-888-4213
www.transunion.com

Contact these bureaus for a copy of your credit report. Some bureaus charge a small fee for a copy of your report. In certain circumstances, you may be entitled to receive a copy of your credit report free of charge. For example, if you have been denied credit within the last 60 days, the bureau that supplied the report to the creditor must provide the report to you free of charge. Also, if you suspect that you may be a victim of identity theft, or there is potential fraudulent activity associated with your account, you can contact the bureaus directly for additional information.

If you find inaccuracies or information that you want to clarify, contact the credit bureau and explain the error(s). The bureau is required to re-verify the information within 30 days or remove it from your file. If there is negative information that must remain in your file, you may provide the bureau with a brief explanation (100 words) that will be kept in your file. Negative information is generally kept for seven years; bankruptcy information for 10.
Telecommunications
Caller ID is a service offered by telephone companies in most areas across the United States. Subscribing to Caller ID allows you to see the numbers from which incoming calls are placed before you pick up the telephone. If you don't recognize a number, you have the choice to answer or not.

If you don't want your number revealed to those who have Caller ID, your local telephone company may offer per-call or per-line blocking mechanisms to prevent it from being displayed.

Companies with 800 and 900 numbers can use a similar identification technology to record your telephone number when you call. Some firms use your number to help retrieve your records faster and improve the quality and speed of handling your call. Be aware that some firms may also match your number to your name and address to add to customer lists created for marketing or service purposes.

Cellular and cordless phone conversations are easily monitored. You may choose to avoid conducting confidential conversations on these phones, especially phone calls in which you reveal credit card numbers or other personal or confidential information.
Rebate, Incentive, Discount, and Warranty Programs
Retailers that offer rebate and incentive programs often ask for your name, address, and phone number. If this concerns you, ask whether you can participate without providing this personal information.

Some retailers may provide you with a postcard or coupon offering a discount on their products or services. By redeeming the offer when you present the postcard or coupon, you may also be providing personal information to the retailer. This information may be used by the retailer to send you future marketing offers.

It is in your interest to return warranty cards to manufacturers with your contact information, so they can notify you about product warnings and recalls. You may leave blank those questions you feel are unnecessary, and request in writing to opt out of marketing programs based on the type of personal information you provide.

You may also want to contact the retailer to find out who has access to the information you are providing to them to participate in these programs. Some companies use this data to create mailing lists that are sold to marketers. Many consumers find receiving such offers a benefit; others do not.
Direct Mail, Telemarketing, and E-mail Offers
Many companies use direct mail, telemarketing, and e-mail to reach consumers. If you do not wish to be solicited, there are some steps you can take to reduce the number of solicitations you receive:
  • Write to the companies that are contacting you and ask to be removed from their lists.
  • Watch for special billing inserts provided by some companies that let you exclude your name from their lists.
  • Say "no" to telemarketers who want more information than you feel is necessary and to those who refuse to send follow-up explanatory materials. Under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (a U.S. federal law), a telemarketer who calls you cannot continue this practice after you have requested that the calls stop.
  • The Federal Trade Commission has instituted the "National Do Not Call Registry," where you may register your telephone number (http://www.ftc.gov/donotcall). Also, many states have laws and regulations governing telemarketing, and maintain their own "do not call" lists that you can sign up for. Check to see if your state has a "do not call" Web site.
  • Send an e-mail reply to the e-mail offers from companies or organizations you do not wish to hear from, and request to be removed from future e-mail marketing lists. Or, follow the opt-out instructions that the sender may provide in the e-mail offer.
  • Look for a privacy statement or policy on Web sites you visit. The statement should explain what information is collected, how it is used and safeguarded, and how to set your e-mail marketing preferences.
  • The Direct Marketing Association (DMA) maintains lists of consumers who do not wish to receive marketing offers. The DMA can be reached online at: http://www.dmaconsumers.org/consumerassistance.html
To register online:
http://www.dmaconsumers.org
Please note that the DMA charges consumers $5.00 to register online for these services.

To register by mail:
Registration for DMA Mail Preferences and Telephone Preferences Services are also available by mail. Follow this link, http://www.dmaconsumers.org, for additional information.

Identification Needed for Purchases
When paying with a major credit or charge card:
  • Do not provide your telephone number for identification when using a major credit or charge card. However, a merchant that has no electronic or telephone connection with the card company to verify your account at the time of purchase may still ask for a telephone number.
  • Do not write your telephone number on credit or charge card purchase slips.
When paying by check:
  • Do not put your Social Security number on your check.
  • Do not allow your credit or charge card account number to be written on your personal check. A number of states forbid merchants to record credit or charge card account numbers on personal checks. Merchants are permitted to simply note whether you have a major credit or charge card as an indicator of your creditworthiness. Exceptions include emergency check cashing, where you have pre-approved the use of your card to guarantee your check. Be forewarned, however, that merchants may refuse to accept your check if you refuse to allow them to record your card number.

For More Information
If you need further guidance, you may wish to consult the consumer affairs office of the company involved, the U.S. Better Business Bureau, or your local or state consumer protection agency.
Changes to the Internet Privacy Statement
Changes to our Internet Privacy Statement will be noted here so that you can be fully informed about the privacy protections we provide and your choices with regard to our use of personal information for marketing purposes.

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